New Platform Flips Traditional On-Demand Supply Chain Approach on its Head

TROY, N.Y. — Imagine you are heading to the grocery store and receive a phone alert asking if you’d also be willing to bring your neighbor’s groceries home. Or you are on your way to a concert and see you could fill the seats of your car—and your wallet—if you picked up a few other music fans along the way. As the supplier in these scenarios, you have the choice of which services you provide and when. This may very well be the way commerce is headed.

Machine Learning Approach for Low-Dose CT Imaging Yields Superior Results

TROY, N.Y. —Machine learning has the potential to vastly advance medical imaging, particularly computerized tomography (CT) scanning, by reducing radiation exposure and improving image quality.

Those new research findings were just published in Nature Machine Intelligence by engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and radiologists at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Manipulating Light-Matter Interaction Unlocks Properties for Quantum Information Storage and Computing

TROY, N.Y. – Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have come up with a way to manipulate tungsten diselenide (WSe2) —a promising two-dimensional material—to further unlock its potential to enable faster, more efficient computing, and even quantum information processing and storage. Their findings were published today in Nature Communications.

Classification System Based on Co-Occurring Conditions May Provide Insight Into Autism

TROY, N.Y – Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are often affected by co-occurring conditions, such as epilepsy, immune disorders, gastrointestinal problems, and developmental delays. According to research published today in Autism Research, creating a classification system for ASD based on co-occurring conditions could provide useful insights into the underlying mechanics of ASD and these conditions. 

Improved Imaging for Prostate Cancer Could Lead to More Effective Treatment

TROY, N.Y. —Engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are working to improve imaging methods in order to make medicine more precise and personalized. This work will be a critical component of a new interdisciplinary research project funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that seeks to improve radiation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer patients. 

“In order to do precision medicine, you need to see better,” said Pingkun Yan, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer. “If you cannot see, you can’t do anything.”